PHIL 331: Biomedical Ethics

Recommended by 4 members

Easiness      Usefulness      Interest
2.50 / 5.00
    4.75 / 5.00     4.75 / 5.00

Easy Elective? No
Prof Quality  4.50 / 5.00  for Kluge


Course Description: from http://web.uvic.ca/calendar2014-09/CDs/PHIL/331.html

An investigation into various ethical issues that arise in the delivery of health care. Lectures and discussions on topics such as informed consent, abortion, human experimentation, euthanasia, reproductive technologies, the health-care professional/client relationship. Emphasis on the ability to apply theoretical concepts to actual situations.

Note: May not be counted towards upper-level requirements in Honours or Major programs in Philosophy.

Prerequisites: Minimum second-year standing or permission of the department.

Units: 1.5, Hours: 3-0


Member Comments:
“You learn all the basic ethics involved with health care and biological sciences. Kluge is extremely overqualified to be teaching; he is a wealthy source of knowledge and inspires you to think critically about everything. But it’s not that easy. The course really sets you up well for going into the medical profession, and makes you question whether it’s really for you when you realize many of the stark realities of it. I feel it also has better prepared me for future medical school interviews.”

“Going into medical school, this will be very useful as I learned so much about medical ethics.”

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PHIL 203: Elementary Formal Logic

Recommended by 1 member

Easiness      Usefulness      Interest
    3 / 5
                 4 / 5                 4 / 5

Easy Elective? Depends on individual
Prof Quality  5 / 5  for Klatt


Course Description: from http://web.uvic.ca/calendar2014-09/CDs/PHIL/203.html

Explores the fundamentals of good reasoning by means of symbolic techniques in both propositional and predicate logic. Students will learn to translate English sentences into logical notation, as well as how to use truth tables and derivations to demonstrate the validity of arguments.

Note: Designed as a first course in logic for students with little or no symbolic orientation. May be taken before or after 201.

Units: 1.5, Hours: 3-0


Member Comments:
“The workload is light if you’re good at problem solving. The professor is fantastic and devotes a lot of time to help you understand the concepts. If you put the effort it, it’s relatively easy to get a great grade and enjoy the course.”

PHIL 201: Critical Thinking

Recommended by 1 member

Easiness      Usefulness      Interest
    4 / 5                 3 / 5                 4 / 5

Easy Elective? Depends on individual
Prof Quality  5 / 5  for Klatt


Course Description: from http://web.uvic.ca/calendar2014-09/CDs/PHIL/201.html

An analysis of simple argument forms in natural language with close attention to the different uses of language in an argumentative context. A treatment of elementary principles of inductive logic, decision making, syllogistic reasoning, and informal fallacies.

Note: Designed as a first course in logic for students with little or no symbolic orientation; it may be taken before or after 203.

Units: 1.5, Hours: 3-0


Member Comments:
“If you do the practice problems and tests you can get an A quite easily. Great professor willing to help.”